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Binoy

i, THe biker
27 Year Old

Currently Riding

Yamaha-FZ16

Past Owned

Other

Riding Experience

No. of Years : 10,
Kilometers done (appox) : 30000

Nominated For

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For you, what does it mean to be a motorcyclist?

People often use clichés like passion, hobby, life, etc. to describe what it means to be a motorcyclist; but in my opinion, it's impossible to express it in words.
Being a motorcyclist is being a part of this brotherhood where you're respected irrespective of your identity, education or bank balance. Best example of that is when you're riding in Ladakh where every single rider will wave at you and/or gives you a thumbs up. And if anybody breaks down, a biker brother will always stop by and help you out.
Being a Motorcyclist/Biker means following the unofficial code of ethics that encompasses everything from respecting nature to protecting women & from standing your ground to being a man of your word. And for the brotherhood, I always follow this one golden rule, "Come hell or high water, never leave a biker brother or sister alone."

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How has motorcycling changed you and your life?

Motorcycling has made me realize one thing, i.e. if I set my eyes on something, I'll do it no matter what. Before I started my solo trip to Leh, everyone said it's suicidal and that it shouldn't be done. But I wanted to do it, and I did it. It also taught me to be self-reliant.
On my motorcycling trips I've met many interesting people, heard their stories & have found a new perspective on life. A petrolpump attendant from Haryana who went to Kailash-Mansarovar, a Swiss couple (aged 70+) who've been trekking all across Himalayas, a 60+ Gautemalan lady who left her lucrative job in US to travel the world & many others whom I met on my biking trips have taught me 1 thing - you're never too old or too poor to chase your dreams.From these experiences, I've decided to not to worry abt mundane life details & only follow my dreams. Because,YOLO!

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How would you justify the inherent dangers and risk involved in long distance touring on motorcycles?

Simple - by not justifying at all.
Had Felix Baumgartner listened to his distractors, he would've never jumped from 39 km., from the edge of the space. Neil Armstrong didn't become the first man to step on the moon by justifying the dangers to his uncle. John Goddard wouldn't have got a single tick mark on his bucket list had he listened to his neighbor about how risky his adventures are.
Danger will always be there; that's the exact reason why it's called an 'Adventure.' It's impossible to have a logical argument with most of these irrational critics; best thing to do is to simply avoid them and only confide in your own ability. All it takes to shut them up is that ONE EPIC long distance tour. Tried & tested.

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Tell us briefly about your 2 most memorable motorcycle tours?

1) 1000 km+ Mumbai - Ahmedabad - Mumbai solo ride (2011)
During the first part of the trip, Mum - A'bad,I had a puncture twice.
On return trip: A'bad - Mumbai, I again had a puncture,this time in the middle of nowhere while I was running 102 fever and severe stomach cramps. In that condition,I pushed my bike uphill for 2.5 km. before finding a mechanic (all 'cause I wasn't carrying a puncture kit).

2) Leh'd (2013)
Transported my bike to Delhi via train. Started riding from Delhi & reached Leh via Manali. Returned to Delhi via Srinagar route.From Delhi I rode all the way to Mumbai. On my trip,I conquered world's 3 highest passes - KhardungLa, TanglangLa & ChangLa;and also NamikaLa, ZoziLa, BaralachaLa & FotuLa.
Route: Delhi-Manali-Leh-Srinagar-Delhi-Mumbai.
Final Stat: 1 bike, 1 rider, 7 states, 16 cities, 43 days, 5338.2 km. Life!

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As a motorcycle tourer, how have you contributed to the society/brotherhood and plan to do so in the years to come?

I want to make motorcycle touring more popular in India & want more people to take it up. For this, I'm reaching out to as many people as I can &sharing my experience.

I documented my Bombay to Leh solo trip on various social media platforms. Friends on FB used to be eager to know about my next update,while on twitter the # tag #BombayToLeh reached a wide audience and was appreciated by one & all.

I've been writing a travelogue (on blog) about my trip & have received great response.

Rajasthan Patrika even published an article about my trip.

Based on my experience, I'm writing a series of articles about Motorcycle-Touring for Red Bull India.

I'm slated to be a speaker at Tall Tales Mumbai - a story telling event, where I'll be sharing my experience of traveling from Bombay to Leh on bike, in front of an audience of 100-150.

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What are the best and the worst things about motorcycle touring in India?

THE BEST THING: The respect & honour. Whenever I go on bike trips, seeing me in pro-riding gear, people always get inquisitive and start asking Qs. And they respect me for my feats.
Second best thing: Despite the questionable road network, India still has such a varied geography & terrain - from deserts of Rajasthan to mountain passes of Himalayas and from green patches of North-East to backwaters of Kerala; as biker, you always have a new road to ride on and a new avenue to explore.
The third best thing about motorcycle touring in India is: Never having to pay toll tax. EVER.

And the worst thing is that it's still at a very nascent stage. We still don't hv a Bike Rally/Festival that's even half as good or as big as Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. We really need bike festival(s) of epic proportions to satiate the appetite of Indian bikers.

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yellow-bike

Golden Question : How do you feel when you ride?

People who don't understand biking passion, have often asked similar me Qs, "Why do you ride?", "How it makes you feel?", "Why don't you take public transport instead?" & variations thereof.But I've never been able to answer them satisfactorily. Asking, "How do you feel when you ride?",is like asking, "How do you feel when you breath after being underwater for few minutes?" While riding, I feel liberated; I feel like I'm unshackling myself from all the thoughts,emotions & baggage that's been tying me down. For me riding is not physical work whr I open the throttle & it moves,BUT it's an emotion. In fact,riding is paradox: On one side,I'm rebelling against the convention, at the same time, I'm in-tune with the nature. Riding is better than any drug. And best part is - it's legal. Hence, I like sniffing kilometers instead of LSD.

Power Biker

Riding Experience as a Power Biker


No. of Years : 10

    

Kilometers done (appox) : 30000

bike-image

For you, what does it mean to be a motorcyclist?

People often use clichés like passion, hobby, life, etc. to describe what it means to be a motorcyclist; but in my opinion, it's impossible to express it in words.
Being a motorcyclist is being a part of this brotherhood where you're respected irrespective of your identity, education or bank balance. Best example of that is when you're riding in Ladakh where every single rider will wave at you and/or gives you a thumbs up. And if anybody breaks down, a biker brother will always stop by and help you out.
Being a Motorcyclist/Biker means following the unofficial code of ethics that encompasses everything from respecting nature to protecting women & from standing your ground to being a man of your word. And for the brotherhood, I always follow this one golden rule, "Come hell or high water, never leave a biker brother or sister alone."

  • View Image

bike-image

How has motorcycling changed you and your life?

Motorcycling has made me realize one thing, i.e. if I set my eyes on something, I'll do it no matter what. Before I started my solo trip to Leh, everyone said it's suicidal and that it shouldn't be done. But I wanted to do it, and I did it. It also taught me to be self-reliant.
On my motorcycling trips I've met many interesting people, heard their stories & have found a new perspective on life. A petrolpump attendant from Haryana who went to Kailash-Mansarovar, a Swiss couple (aged 70+) who've been trekking all across Himalayas, a 60+ Gautemalan lady who left her lucrative job in US to travel the world & many others whom I met on my biking trips have taught me 1 thing - you're never too old or too poor to chase your dreams.From these experiences, I've decided to not to worry abt mundane life details & only follow my dreams. Because,YOLO!

  • View Image

bike-image

How would you justify the inherent dangers and risk involved in riding on motorcycles?

Simple - by not justifying at all.
Had Felix Baumgartner listened to his distractors, he would've never jumped from 39 km., from the edge of the space. Neil Armstrong didn't become the first man to step on the moon by justifying the dangers to his uncle. John Goddard wouldn't have got a single tick mark on his bucket list had he listened to his neighbor about how risky his adventures are.
Danger will always be there; that's the exact reason why it's called an 'Adventure.' It's impossible to have a logical argument with most of these irrational critics; best thing to do is to simply avoid them and only confide in your own ability. All it takes to shut them up is that ONE EPIC long distance tour.
After conquering world's top 3 passses (including Khardungla ppl now know how perfect rider I am and hence, nobody says a word.

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bike-image

Tell us briefly about your 2 most memorable life-incidents involving you as a motorcyclist?

1. In June '13, I went on a 43 day, 5300 km+ Delhi-Leh-Mumbai trip. Day 1: Reached Delhi via train & my bike reached earlier via another train. I went from platform 3 to pf.1 to pf. 16 to pf. 3(north end) to pf. 3(south end) to pf. 16 to pf. 3 in search of my bike. I walked 5-6 km. while wearing a double-layered biking jacket & carrying 30-35 kg. of luggage (saddle bag, shoulder bag, backpack & a bag containing helmet, gloves & bungee cords) in Delhi heat. As they say, what doesn't kill you...

2.Was traveling from Hunder (Nubra Valley) to Turtuk (last village on Indian border). I stopped at an army post to ask directions.They Addressed me as "Sir" & spoke w/ utmost respect. They gave me juice & said, "Sir, chai ya aur kuch chahiye? Hamare layak aur koi seva ho to bataiye?" My heroes-Armymen giving me so much respect was really touching

  • View Image

bike-image

As a motorcyclist, how have you contributed to the society/brotherhood and plan to do so in the years to come?

I want to make motorcycle touring more popular in India & want more people to take it up. For this, I'm reaching out to as many people as I can &sharing my experience.

I documented my Bombay to Leh solo trip on various social media platforms. Friends on FB used to be eager to know about my next update,while on twitter the # tag #BombayToLeh reached a wide audience and was appreciated by one & all.

I've been writing a travelogue (on blog) about my trip & have received great response.

Rajasthan Patrika even published an article about my trip.

Based on my experience, I'm writing a series of articles about Motorcycle-Touring for Red Bull India.

I'm slated to be a speaker at Tall Tales Mumbai - a story telling event, where I'll be sharing my experience of traveling from Bombay to Leh on bike, in front of an audience of 100-150.

  • View Image

bike-image

What are the best and the worst things about motorcycling in India?

THE BEST THING: The respect & honour. Whenever I go on bike trips, seeing me in pro-riding gear, people always get inquisitive and start asking Qs. And they respect me for my feats.
Second best thing: Despite the questionable road network, India still has such a varied geography & terrain - from deserts of Rajasthan to mountain passes of Himalayas and from green patches of North-East to backwaters of Kerala; as biker, you always have a new road to ride on and a new avenue to explore.
The third best thing about motorcycle touring in India is: Never having to pay toll tax. EVER.

And the worst thing is that it's still at a very nascent stage. We still don't hv a Bike Rally/Festival that's even half as good or as big as Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. We really need bike festival(s) of epic proportions to satiate the appetite of Indian bikers.

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